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Washington State University Calendar

Museum Walk-Through With Michael Holloman

TRADITION & CHANGE: CONTEXTUALIZING THE ART OF RICK BARTOW |

The Museum of Art/WSU will host an exhibition walk-through with Michael Holloman, Associate Professor of Art History and American Indian Studies, Washington State University on February 22 from 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. in the Museum Gallery.

Drawing from his experiences as a liaison between regional tribes and cultural institutions, Michael Holloman will lead a discussion in defining traditional Native arts and then guide us through the emergence of indigenous artists within the contemporary art field. Professor Holloman will place the work of Rick Bartow in a contemporary context through highlighting a key works within the exhibition.

LOCATION | The Museum of Art is located on Wilson Road across from Martin Stadium in the Fine Arts Center on the WSU Pullman campus. Gallery hours are Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., closed Sunday and Monday. For more information please contact the museum at 509-335-1910.

EXHIBIT | RICK BARTOW: Things You Know But Cannot Explain, Museum of Art/WSU

Exhibit: January 24 – March 11, 2017
Reception: Thursday, January 26, 5-6 p.m.
Lecture: Thursday, January 26, 6-7 p.m.
(With Dr. Rebecca Dobkins, Professor of Anthropology and Curator of Native American Art, Hallie Ford Museum of Art, Willamette University)

The Museum of Art/WSU announces an Exhibition by Rick Bartow: Thing You Know But Cannot Explain, Jan. 24–Mar. 11, 2017. An opening reception and lecture will be held 5-7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 26, in the Museum of Art gallery. Admission to the museum is free.

ABOUT | Representing more than forty years of work, Rick Bartow: Things You Know But Cannot Explain features a broad selection of sculptures, paintings, drawings and prints, drawn from public and private collections, including the artist’s studio, that affirm this extraordinary artist’s regional, national, and international impact. Personal experiences, cultural engagement and global myths, especially Native American transformation stories, are at the heart of Bartow’s art. Animals and self-portraits populate his iconography, and he was known for astute interpretations of literary, musical and visual sources.

Born in 1946, Bartow was a member of the Wiyot tribe of Northern California and had close ties with Oregon’s Siletz community. His work has been featured in many solo and group exhibitions and is in numerous public and private collections. A recent career highlight was the completion of We Were Always Here (2012), a monumental pair of sculptures over 20 feet high installed on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The renowned artist recently passed away in the spring of 2016.

Rick Bartow: Things You Know But Cannot Explain was organized by the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, University of Oregon.

LOCATION | The Museum of Art is located on Wilson Road across from Martin Stadium in the Fine Arts Center on the WSU Pullman campus. Gallery hours are Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., closed Sunday and Monday. For more information please contact the museum at 509-335-1910.

CHRIS WATTS | 2016 Fine Arts Faculty Focus Exhibition

The Museum of Art/WSU announces a retrospective journey in a Fine Arts Faculty Focus Exhibition by artist Chris Watts, Aug. 22– Sept. 17. An opening reception will be held 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 25, in the Museum of Art gallery with a talk given by the artist at 7 p.m.  Admission to the museum is free.

The Museum of Art has a long-standing tradition of presenting work by department of Fine Arts faculty members. Since 2004, these exhibits have alternated large group shows with a biennial exhibit showcasing a recently retired faculty member. This year the museum presents a retrospective exhibit of Chris Watts’ work, who retired in 2015, after 27 years of teaching at WSU.

ABOUT | Chris Watts’ work represents a long-term interest in patterning, order and to a certain degree spiritual or esoteric ideas. His images use numbers to explore location and sequential relationships often based on spiral, diagonal and horizontal forms.  Viewers often become involved in the process of uncovering how his images are formed and he is very interested in exploring those deeper contemplative moments where the viewer’s thoughts drift inward—perhaps into their own interpretation as to the place that patterns of all types have on our experience.  In an effort to broaden the influence that order, placement, and patterning have had on the evolution of his inquiries, Chris takes interest in subjects such as Bronze Age stone monuments, spirals and mazes, Pythagoras, counting processes, scientific structures, bell ringing, Theosophy, sound, the geometrical tradition in art, and of course pattern.

LOCATION | The Museum of Art is located on Wilson Road across from Martin Stadium in the Fine Arts Center on the WSU Pullman campus. Gallery hours are Monday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., open until 7 p.m. on Thursdays and closed on Sundays. For more information please contact the museum at 509-335-1910.

SPECIAL THANKS | This exhibit is funded by the Members of the Museum of Art and the Samuel H. and Patricia W. Smith Arts Endowment.